Origins of Stories

Atop the Royal Liver Building in Liverpool, sit two Liver Birds. Bertie faces inland, watching over the city. Bella faces out to sea, watching over the seamen. The birds are surely aware of each other’s presence, sitting as they do at opposite ends of the building, pointing away from each other. They surely feel the weight of the chains that bind them to the building. Their isolation and captivity secure the future of the city – if they were to mate and fly away, Liverpool would cease to exist, apparently. But who says? And what would that even mean? Or is it simply romantic anthropomorphism to presume the two birds are in love but cursed with their duty? They’re just two concrete statues on top of a building that have inspired and evolved a story. Aren’t they? Like everything else, it’s all in your mind…

The above is an extract from my #WIP, #Underrated. It’s unedited. It might well end up as the prologue. I’m aiming to finish the novel before the blackberries are gone…

Liver Birds

Published by morwennablackwood

When Morwenna Blackwood was six years old, she got told off for filling a school exercise book with an endless story when she should have been listening to the teacher/eating her tea/colouring with her friends. The story was about a frog. It never did end; and Morwenna never looked back. Born and raised in Devon, Morwenna suffered from severe OCD and depression, and spent her childhood and teens in libraries. She travelled about for a decade before returning to Devon. She now has an MA in Creative Writing from the University of Exeter, and lives with her husband, son and three cats in a cottage that Bilbo Baggins would be proud of. Her debut psychological thriller, The (D)Evolution of Us, published by #darkstroke, is an Amazon best-seller; her second novel, Glasshouse, although a standalone, is part of the same series, and has also become a bestseller. When she is not writing, Morwenna works for an animal rescue charity, or can be found down by the sea. She often thinks about that frog.

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